Ladies, it’s time to take control!

Elise Ryan is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

I was reading an article entitled ‘More women will end up alone and managing their own money’ by Georgina Dent in The Age¹ and was astounded at the lack of confidence women have in their abilities.

It really struck a cord with me and I was trying to work out why and I think a quote from the article summed it up quite nicely

 

“women not only underestimate their own capabilities but they overestimate what is required to be financially involved.”

 

You shouldn’t need a man or spouse to provide you with a sense of financial security, your knowledge and understanding of your finances should be all the security you need. It can be as simple as understanding where your money is going and track your expenditures, it isn’t even hard these days you can do it on an app on your phone.

It is common in a relationship for one person to take the lead with the finances, like with a lot of household tasks. However, you are a partnership and should have an understanding of what is going on and not just leave it up to the other person so there are no surprises as to your financial position.

It is interesting that this trend is not changing with millennials, with the greater focus on women’s independence there is no trend in women stepping up and taking control of the finances, they are behaving quite primitively.

My experience from growing up is that the overall finances was a team effort. My Mum did the grunt work of paying the bills and banking but both Mum and Dad together with their Financial Advisor would look at the strategic side of things.

My relationship with my Fiancé is no different. James is happy for me to look after the day to day but he wants to be involved with the long term strategic planning.

Women should be paying more attention. We live longer, tend to have more gaps in employment and average lower pay throughout our careers.

This means that at some point in time we will need to be the ones in control and making the decisions.

Don’t know where to start, book an appointment with a Financial Advisor, find someone you can trust and identify with. They should help educate you and not make you feel dumb or silly for asking questions. Worrying about how much advice will cost or thinking that you don’t have enough money shouldn’t be a barrier for booking an appointment.

 

¹ The Age 17/06/2018, More women will end up alone and managing their own money, Georgina Dent.

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way
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Changes To Superannuation From 1 July 2018

Australians buying their first home or downsizing in retirement are about to receive a helping hand thanks to new superannuation rules which come into effect on July 1. From that date, first home buyers will be able to contribute up to $30,000 into their super fund towards a home deposit while downsizers can put up to $300,000 of the proceeds of selling the family home into super.

This new measure has been devised to assist first home buyers, many of whom have struggled to save a deposit as rising prices put even entry level properties out of reach.

At the other end of the scale, the change is envisaged to help older homeowners who frequently find themselves in large houses while trying to survive on a modest super balance or the aged pension.

Here’s how the Federal Government hopes to improve the situation at both ends of the property market.

Buying a home

Under the new First Home Super Saver (FHSS) scheme, individuals can arrange for up to $30,000 to be deducted from their pre-tax income and put in their super account. They can then withdraw 85 per cent of that money ($25,500), plus any interest they’ve earned on it, to use for a home deposit. In the case of a couple, both partners can save $30,000, meaning a deposit of $51,000 (i.e. 85 per cent of $60,000) plus interest can be accumulated.

So what’s the catch?
It’s complicated.

For starters, individuals can only contribute $15,000 into their FHSS account in any one year. What’s more, the compulsory 9.5 per cent super contributions made by employers can’t be accessed; additional voluntary contributions need to be made. The annual contributions cap of $25,000 cannot be exceeded; this includes all voluntary contributions plus employer’s Super Guarantee contributions.

When the money is withdrawn, it is taxed at the individual’s marginal tax rate minus a 30 per cent tax offset. Effectively, that means most people will pay little or no tax although higher-income earners on high marginal rates will still pay some tax.

Selling a home

Under the Downsizer Super Contribution Scheme (DSC), homeowners who are 65 or older can put up to $300,000 of their home sale proceeds into their super provided it’s their place of residence and they’ve owned it for at least 10 years. In the case of a couple, both partners can deposit $300,000 (collectively $600,000) into super.

What’s the catch?

Unless you’re a wealthy retiree looking for a tax break there doesn’t appear to be one. For those who already have more than $1.3 million in super, adding a $300,000 downsizer contribution will breach the $1.6 million balance transfer cap which is the maximum balance that can be held in a tax-free super pension account. Given the current generation of Australians have been retiring with average super balances of well under $300,000, that is unlikely to be an issue for most downsizers.

What do you do now?

If you are looking to purchase your first home, you will need to check your super fund allows FHSS contributions and, more importantly, withdrawals. You’ll then need to arrange for your employer to deduct voluntary contributions of up to $15,000 a year. When you want to access your money, you will have to acquire a ‘FHSS determination’ (essentially a balance statement) from the Commissioner of Taxation before requesting your super fund to release the money.

Following approval of this request, your super fund deposits your FHHS money, minus any tax you’ve incurred, into your account. You then have 12 months to sign a contract to buy or build a home.

If you are looking to downsize your home, you will first need to check your super fund accepts downsizer contributions. If it does, you can deposit up to $300,000 within 90 days of receiving the proceeds of the sale. You’ll have to fill in and send your super fund a ‘downsizer contribution form’ before, or when transferring the money into your account.

If you’re hoping to either buy your first home or downsize, call us to discuss how the changes to super can save you money.

 

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.
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Generations of Wealth

Alison Adams from Income Solutions

Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee 

 

Sometimes financial advice is not about dollars and cents but instead becomes more about goals and objectives.   As Financial Advisors, in the business of building wealth for our clients, we felt it was important to define “wealth” What is wealth   The concept sounds simple enough, and in many ways it is simple. We like to quote John C Bogle, the author of The little book of Common Sense Investing, “simple but not easy”.  Often, the “not easy” part involves the goal of leaving a meaningful legacy to those whom you love.  We find this is a common theme amongst our clients. It is one thing to invest for your own future but once you have successfully taken that journey, commonly thoughts turn to making sure your hard work benefits your children and grandchildren. So, what is needed?  Successful estate planning takes an investment of time, careful consideration of your desired outcomes and the assistance of a quality Financial Advisor and specialist Estate Planning Lawyer. Did you know that your superannuation account balance and jointly held assets are not administered by your Will?   For estate planning purposes, these types of financial assets are called “non estate assets”. For the majority of people, their superannuation account is likely to be one of their biggest assets. Another contender for biggest asset may be the family home, commonly jointly owned.  In summary, the two assets often representing the bulk of an individual’s wealth may not be dealt with by their Will.  What about if the bulk of your financial assets are deemed “estate assets” and in the event of your death, these assets will be distributed to your loved ones in accordance with your Will. That should set them up for a financially sound future, right?  One of the biggest destroyers of wealth is the transfer of wealth from generation to generation. Consider your own family circumstances. Even if your family has so far been lucky enough to have escaped the statistics around relationship breakdowns, gambling or drug addiction, how do you know what the future holds for your children or even for your grandchildren?  There are ways that a quality Will can provide a regular income stream to your loved ones and at the same time, protect their inheritance.  David Ramsay, founder and Principal Financial Advisor at Income Solutions likes to say “you love your children and grandchildren; at best, you hope to like their partners”. Here’s some food for thought, consider these scenarios:

  1. Sadly your father passes away and in accordance with his Will, you and your brother inherit the family home. The home sits in prime real estate, with upcoming re-zoning changes making you and your brother think it’s a good idea to rent the house out for a couple of years and sell when all of the changes have passed, holding out for a bigger profit. It’s currently worth $1m, however you believe your strategy could triple that value. Your father had a very simple Will and the home passes to you and your brother, held jointly at 50% each (currently a $500,00 inheritance to each brother). Both you and your brother are married, with young children.  3 months later, you unfortunately pass away in a car accident. Your Will makes provisions for your wife and young family.  Your wife meets with the lawyer and lists all of your assets, including the $500,000 share of the inherited family house. Her Lawyer tells her that unfortunately a jointly held asset is not governed by the Will, and by law, the surviving brother is now the sole owner of the inherited family home. Your wife and children have no legal claim over your share of the house.
  1. 6 years ago you met your second wife, married and now have 3 beautiful girls together. You believe that your family is complete; you have your 3 girls and also 2 sons from your first marriage.  Your ex-wife lives nearby and, although you’ve had rough patches in the past, your 2 sons come and stay every other weekend and because you live nearby you are able to attend their various sporting and school events and enjoy a good relationship with them. The boys have a good relationship with their step sisters, however as they are entering their late teens, lately the relationship between your second wife and the boys is often strained.  Your motto is that things will improve once they get through their teenage years. Unfortunately you have an industrial accident at work and pass away.  You have a current Will which makes provisions for your current wife to inherit the majority of your assets, with smaller amounts distributed to all of your children.  You’ve had discussions with your second wife about how you would like her look after all of your children, and upon her passing, distribute your assets evenly. These wishes were reflected in her Will, drafted at the same time you drafted your Will. Your second wife is advised that, following your death, her existing Will is invalid and she makes arrangements with her Lawyer to draft a new Will immediately. After all, she’s the only parent left for her girls.  The new Will is drawn, making provisions for your 3 daughters but excluding any provisions for your 2 sons.
  1. You have worked hard and sacrificed through the years to build a sizeable investment portfolio. The portfolio derives enough income to support your lifestyle and consists of growth assets that should continue to support both your children and grandchildren when you pass.  You have never been in the business of spending money “for the sake of it” and when you hear about DIY Will kits that you can purchase for $69.95 at the local newsagents, you go for it. After all, it’s pretty simple – you want your kids to inherit it, don’t touch it and live off the income, just as you have. When they pass, you want their Will to provide the same directions to their children. You’ve even sat all of your kids down and told them as much and they all agreed.  You pass away a contented man, proud of your life’s achievements and the way you’ve provided for your family’s future. Only problem is:
  • Daughter number 1 has a marriage breakdown 2 years after you pass away.  She directly inherited your assets in her own name, meaning they formed part of the divorce settlement. Half of your inheritance has now been distributed to her ex-husband, who, truth be known, you never really liked anyway.
  • Son number 2 has never been good at managing his money. Before you passed, you asked your other children to keep an eye on him, but they’re so busy with their own lives that they can’t keep track of him as well.  A few ill advised investment decisions later and he’s lost at least 3/4 of his inheritance.
  • Son number 3 is self employed and just prior to your passing, he ran one of the biggest engineering businesses in town (a great source of pride for you). Unfortunately the majority of his business involved supplying and servicing the machinery at 2 local car manufacturers. Since those manufacturers have closed down, he’s put on a brave face but in truth, new business has proved too hard to find and he’s just about to declare bankruptcy.  The only thing that can save him is your inheritance but due to a quirk of bad timing, he is forced to use the inheritance to pay his debts and close his business. He’s not in debt, however he has no business and no inheritance.

These 3 scenarios are fictitious, however similar scenarios are happening each and every day.  Sadly, they are preventable. Advice from a good quality Financial Advisor and specialist Estate Planning Lawyer would ensure sound investment strategies could accompany estate planning protections. The outcome being that the transfer of wealth through generations can successfully be achieved.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.  Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product.

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Estate Planning and Expecting

I’m six weeks away from having my second child and all of the normal feelings of excitement and nerves are in abundance!

This time round however, I am feeling more comfortable that my children will be brought up the way I want, and be provided for financially, if the worst were to happen. If I were to die, or my husband and I were to die together, we now have a plan which gives us huge peace of mind. We know that our children will have the best guardians they could possibly have, and they will not be left under any financial stress.

As the reality of becoming a mum for the first time two years ago rushed towards me, it gave me that kick up the bum to take some important things out of the ‘too hard basket’ and get sorted. It was only while stocking up on nappies and onesies did I see the importance of having adequate personal insurances. My husband and I were about to become responsible for another human being! Our baby would be totally dependent on us. I quickly organised with a trusted adviser to review our situation and together we went through a process that analysed our position, understood our needs, and put appropriate cover levels in place prior to the arrival of baby Lachlan (just in the nick of time!)

This second time round, I have been a little more organised. I knew I needed to refresh the $30 Post Office will kit my husband and I put in place ten years ago when we got married. Our only dependent then was our beloved Golden Retriever fur baby, Max. He was going to be well taken care of in my or our absence, and our limited super balances would be passed on to each other in the first instance, or the people we wanted if we both passed away (or so we thought).

We still hadn’t changed this will since having Lachlan, so I decided to attend one of the Estate Planning sessions run monthly at our offices by Bronwen Charleson, (Principal Lawyer) or Daniel Black (Senior Lawyer) at Coulter Roache Lawyers—I soon realised that our post office kit was in fact not sufficient and neither were our assumed superannuation arrangements.

Bronwen spoke about various strategies to pass wealth on to intended beneficiaries in the most protected manner. Depending on circumstances this could be a simple plan to a more comprehensive trust that provides asset protection, tax advantages and a plan and statement of wishes around the care of minors. I met with Bronwen not long after the session and had her ‘refresh’ (i.e. completely rewrite) my will and even include and allow for number two!

If you would like to attend an Estate Planning Session, info and registration details can be found on our website and our next free information session is Monday 11th July, 5:30pm at our Geelong office.

As an additional tip, here is a link to an external site which outlines some of the important aspects of Estate Planning.

Erica Fountain
Head of Innovation 

Please note: The advice in this article is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information.

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