Ladies, it’s time to take control!

Elise Ryan is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

I was reading an article entitled ‘More women will end up alone and managing their own money’ by Georgina Dent in The Age¹ and was astounded at the lack of confidence women have in their abilities.

It really struck a cord with me and I was trying to work out why and I think a quote from the article summed it up quite nicely

 

“women not only underestimate their own capabilities but they overestimate what is required to be financially involved.”

 

You shouldn’t need a man or spouse to provide you with a sense of financial security, your knowledge and understanding of your finances should be all the security you need. It can be as simple as understanding where your money is going and track your expenditures, it isn’t even hard these days you can do it on an app on your phone.

It is common in a relationship for one person to take the lead with the finances, like with a lot of household tasks. However, you are a partnership and should have an understanding of what is going on and not just leave it up to the other person so there are no surprises as to your financial position.

It is interesting that this trend is not changing with millennials, with the greater focus on women’s independence there is no trend in women stepping up and taking control of the finances, they are behaving quite primitively.

My experience from growing up is that the overall finances was a team effort. My Mum did the grunt work of paying the bills and banking but both Mum and Dad together with their Financial Advisor would look at the strategic side of things.

My relationship with my Fiancé is no different. James is happy for me to look after the day to day but he wants to be involved with the long term strategic planning.

Women should be paying more attention. We live longer, tend to have more gaps in employment and average lower pay throughout our careers.

This means that at some point in time we will need to be the ones in control and making the decisions.

Don’t know where to start, book an appointment with a Financial Advisor, find someone you can trust and identify with. They should help educate you and not make you feel dumb or silly for asking questions. Worrying about how much advice will cost or thinking that you don’t have enough money shouldn’t be a barrier for booking an appointment.

 

¹ The Age 17/06/2018, More women will end up alone and managing their own money, Georgina Dent.

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way
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Interviewing a New Financial Planner

Elise Ryan is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

How do you find the right financial planner?

Seeking financial advice can be a daunting task. You work hard for your money, so, in turn, you need to have faith that your financial advisor will make your money work hard for you to achieve your goals.

When you are looking for someone that you will trust it’s a good idea to start the search by asking your friends and family for recommendations. A referral from a trusted person will help you find an adviser with a good reputation, and someone you can have confidence in from the outset.

The next port of call that we suggest is the Financial Planning Association. They have a list of highly qualified professionals here: https://fpa.com.au/find-a-planner/

When you find an advisor that you are interested in meeting, have a look at their education. Look for qualifications like:

  • Bachelor of Commerce (BComm)
  • Certified Financial PlannerTM
  • Master of Financial Planning (MoFP)

Another key indicator is the business that they are working in. Have a look at their website and the offices where they work. If it is a growing, thriving business, they must be doing something right!

When you meet with your potential planner, make sure to interview them, this is your chance to ask them questions like:

  • Are they a specialist in a certain area or for a certain type of client? – for example: women, retirees, young professionals etc
  • What are their qualifications?
  • How many years have they been in the industry? (this is not necessarily the years they have been advising. Many advisors start in the industry and learn the ropes for years before becoming an advisor)
  • What is the process to become a client?
  • What can you expect from the service?
  • Are there additional services such as Accounting, Mortgage Broking & Cash Flow Management?
  • What technology is available to clients interact?

Don’t feel like you must go with the first planner you meet, if you don’t connect with them its ok to interview other planners even within the same business.

At Income Solutions, our first meeting is call The Right Fit.

It is a no obligation “getting to know you” meeting for both the client and the planner. Is it a chance for you to get to know if Income Solutions is the right fit for you and your financial needs and the planner to find out if you are the right client for Income Solutions.

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way
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Managing Family and Finances

Elise Ryan is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

Everyone leads a busy life, but it’s important to take time out to think about your current finances and your financial future.

When you are planning or have a young family, there are a lot of important tasks that are on your mind. It is easy to let every day things like managing your finances fall to the wayside.

Paying the bills is quick and easy, but thinking about the big picture in 10, 20 or 30 years down the track can feel like a daunting task. Many people think retirement is so far away and that they have plenty of time before they need to start looking at planning for that phase of their lives. There is also the belief that it will just work itself out.

But you are reading this, so take the time now to think about your life in 30 years’ time.

You don’t want to regret not planning for your future.

By engaging an advisor, it forces you to take time out once or twice a year to chat about your goals and strategy and make adjustment where needed. This helps you to not only be aware but also re-evaluate what’s important to you and what your goals are year to year.

Research shows that by writing down your goals, you are more likely to plan and work towards achieving them.

By having a trusted financial advisor to look at your goals and create a tailored strategy, you will have to spend less time thinking about your financial future, and you will be in a much better position in the future.

At Income Solutions, we place a lot of time educating our clients on our investment philosophy so that they walk out of their meetings with complete understanding of what their strategy will be and how it will help them reach their financial goals.

It’s never too late to re-assess your financial position and change your strategy, and it’s never too early for your teenage children to start understanding their finances.

We run 4 events each month that will help you start making a plan, no matter what stage you are in for planning your finances:

Common Sense Investing

Common Sense Estate Planning

Kickstart: Your Financial Future

Pivot: Choose Your Financial Direction

We urge you to have a look at our website – www.incomesolutions.com.au/events or have a chat to one of our financial advisors to see which event would help you to achieve your goals, for you and your family.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way
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Peace of Mind is King

We have all heard both sides of the argument between owning a home and renting a home. You would have all experienced loyalists to both sides of the argument passionately lecturing you about why their side is superior to the other. It all comes down to what it is you want to achieve, and above all else, peace of mind.

It is an interesting phrase, peace of mind, often referred to as a sleep at night factor. The Collins Dictionary defines it to mean ‘the absence of worry’.¹ Whenever making a decision in life – financial or not – I believe the criterion we should give the most weighting to is whichever option gives you the best sleep at night. There is no point making a decision and lying in bed at 2am every night worrying if you made the right one or not. That is not what life is about.

Circling back to the argument of renting a house versus buying a house. Each side has its own logic and merit, there is no doubt about that. A house is a lifestyle asset so we need to be prudent in ensuring the costs associated with owning or renting one does not adversely affect our lifestyle too much. Let’s break down some advantages and disadvantages of the two, and I will focus on living in the Geelong area as a reference point.

When you own your home, the first thing people realise is a sense of stability. The home is now yours, and provided you have no issues repaying the mortgage, it is very difficult for anybody to take it off you. Although, it can be done², think ‘The Castle’.

What’s more than the sense of stability is the emotional attachment you have with your home. This is often deemed priceless. Most people would have memories of their family home growing up. Because you own it, you can do what you like, such as drawing a height chart on the wall that you add to on your children’s birthdays, renovating, putting picture frames wherever you like, and if you’re lucky, you could even put a pool in.

Arguably, the most valuable aspect of home ownership is the opportunity to use the equity you potentially own to invest for the future. For this opportunity to become beneficial, you have either got to paydown the principal of your mortgage significantly, or are lucky enough to own a home in an area that has experienced large capital growth. The lifestyle on offer in the Geelong area is envied all around the world, which has lead to capital growth in recent years. So much so, they have developed a new estate in Armstrong Creek. The demand for homes in this area is so strong, that the average time a home listed by local agent, Armstrong Real Estate, spends advertised on the market is just 16 days. This estate is situated only 10-15 minutes from the Geelong CBD and numerous coastal beaches, what a great lifestyle that would be? If owning a home and having this sort of lifestyle sounds decent, at Income Solutions, we can help assist implementing the strategies necessary to ensure you can lead your desired lifestyle and still get a sound nights sleep without any worries.

Of course, as Gary Ablett now knows, the value of your house can just as easily drop³. There are risks. They do not always go up in value, and, as the owner of a mortgage, you are a slave to interest rates. Interest rates are an obvious issue and can affect your peace of mind. They’re currently quite low, however, they are on the increase. This can cause severe financial stress (4) and is something you’re unlikely to experience whilst renting. On top of rising interest rates are the costs of owning a home. Rates, insurances, maintenance, stamp duty when buying etc. These all add up and it is mandatory to allow for these kinds of costs in your annual budget before making the decision to buy a home. Remember, planning for these can still give you great peace of mind.

Alternatively, there is the option of renting. Viewed with a lot of unfair stigma in this country, renting can be seen as ‘dead money’. I agree, to an extent. In most cases, it can be cheaper to rent a house than it is to buy it. You can live in an area that best suits your lifestyle at a cheaper price. The demand for rentals in the Geelong area is also booming due to the lifestyle on offer; the supply of homes cannot keep up with the demand. Armstrong Real Estate lease out advertised homes in an average of 7 days, such is the popularity of this area.

A prudent renter should use the cash they save on their dwelling and invest this for their future. It is when this cash saving is simply squandered on lifestyle that rent does become dead money. Everybody’s favourite finance commentator, The Barefoot Investor, says in his book that if a person rented the same house their friend had bought, invested the difference in their associated costs, the renter would be in a better financial position in 20-30 years time. True, for the most part.

Another aspect of renting is the flexibility. This can also be seen as uncertainty. If the freezing winter’s of Geelong become too much to handle, it is very easy to simply sign a new lease and move to a place like the Whitsunday’s, not needing to worry about the extremely lengthy time it can take to sell your home. The other side of the same coin is also very real. A family of 5 receiving a letter from their property manager telling them they have 30 days to vacate the premises is surely going to cause a few sleepless nights. If the potential of this happening to you as a renter causes you severe angst and little-to-no peace of mind, then renting is probably not for you.

Personally, I understand that owning a home will cost me more money than renting one. Unfortunately, this country does not offer 10-20 years leases like other countries of the world(5). Therefore, I currently rent, with the goal to own a home in the near future for two reasons. Primarily, I would like to buy a nice little acreage around Geelong. These types of properties are hard to come by as rentals, and I would like to have full control over it. I am aware of the opportunity cost and it is a risk I am willing to take. Secondly, I plan to use the equity I build in my house to invest in my capital base. I will turn my bricks and mortar into an asset, and have it earn me some cash, rather than force me to spend cash on it.

The basic thing is I have a plan. This plan is what gives me peace of mind. At Income Solutions, we can help you create your plan, and, with a bit of luck and forethought, some decent peace of mind as well.

 

1 https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/peace-of-mind
2 https://www.afr.com/real-estate/residential/cancelled-east-west-link-houses-are-being-sold-to-the-public-with-conditions-20150416-1mmedq
3 https://www.news.com.au/finance/real-estate/melbourne-vic/geelong-star-gary-ablett-caps-off-homecoming-with-sale-of-gold-coast-home/news-story/017f13105e10ae150a73b0b8215497a0
4  https://www.yourmortgage.com.au/mortgage-news/nearly-one-million-households-are-in-mortgage-stress/248566/
5 https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/renting-property-dont-hold-your-breath-for-a-long-lease-20141104-11eftx.html
Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.
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The Real Fake News

Being time poor is something I’m convinced affects your intellect.  Or maybe it’s got something to do with the easy access of information that is so readily available to us in our modern society. Perhaps it’s a combination of both.

I really miss the days of listening to the news in the morning before work or spending a lazy weekend morning drinking coffee and reading the broadsheet from back to front. I seem to have replaced that with logging into an online news site to grab the headlines. I roughly know what’s going on at home & abroad. I can keep up with a topical conversation but I’m finding more and more that I don’t know anything “in depth” anymore.  What’s even more frightening is if I’m busy or feeling too tired to exercise my brain, I’m gravitating towards really low brow stuff. I can, for example, tell you all of the dramas of this season’s Married At First Sight.  I’m a little vague on facts for things that really matter.

I know it’s not only me. I can tell this from the repetitive quick read articles on weight loss and get rich quick stories that are being presented to us as “news”.

Being in the Financial Planning industry for over 20 years, I always read the property stories.  I don’t do this for their news content but  just to give myself a giggle. It’s like a sport-will it be good, bad or ugly?  It’s seems the vast majority fall into the good category and I know that’s not the ratio I see in my professional life. It makes me wonder are we just being feed a myth we want to believe?

For 3 consecutive days the same news site ran property articles. Come on, slow news week or what?  One quick read about experts saying property keeps rising and if you are smart enough to know where to find the hot spots, you’ll be rolling in dough soon enough. Another quick read about a lady who used her divorce settlement and with the help of friend “investors” she built her property portfolio that now enables her to stay home with her children and live a comfortable life. The final story from another expert about how property prices are going to crash and lots of people are going to be in financial trouble.

Maybe it’s because I grew up in an era where investigative journalism was a true profession, a time when politicians got grilled when they said or did something questionable and when there was enough money in newsroom budgets to check facts, rather than repeat a press release word for word without objectivity.  I don’t see too much of that anymore (Leigh Sales, I’m not talking about you, you are a shining light).

What I pointedly see is an obsession with property. I haven’t seen any articles about other asset classes, such as shares or cash.  None. To be fair, shares do have a nightly section in the news devoted to market activity but I’m not counting that because it is largely irrelevant news for the vast majority of share investors.

So why are most property articles about individual stories and news about share investment is statistical?  Why isn’t my Dad a newsworthy story when he spruiks the joys of receiving his dividend payment, just like clockwork?  Why is that not promoted but an article about somebody’s property value appreciating is promoted?  I think it’s because we all believe we understand property, with the vast majority of us citing our home as our biggest financial asset (albeit, an “asset” that provides shelter for us rather than a financial return).  Even those who cannot afford to enter the market, understand the concept of property because we all live in property.

The moral of my story-don’t just believe what you read.  For every person who researched or lucked into buying property in the hot spot and made money, there are some who did the opposite and lost money.  For every investor who gambled with friend or family “investment” money (sometimes referred to as life savings), it hasn’t always worked out and relationships have suffered. For every person at smoko who’s made a mint on “whatever”, question it. Live in the world of facts. Live in the world of reality.  It’s not complex but it’s often not easy. What is easy, is to seek professional advice to put a long term plan in place. You don’t take your car to the hairdresser to get serviced.  Don’t take your financial advice from the quick read news or the guy sitting next to you at smoko.  Go to a Financial Planner.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.
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Estate Planning and Expecting

I’m six weeks away from having my second child and all of the normal feelings of excitement and nerves are in abundance!

This time round however, I am feeling more comfortable that my children will be brought up the way I want, and be provided for financially, if the worst were to happen. If I were to die, or my husband and I were to die together, we now have a plan which gives us huge peace of mind. We know that our children will have the best guardians they could possibly have, and they will not be left under any financial stress.

As the reality of becoming a mum for the first time two years ago rushed towards me, it gave me that kick up the bum to take some important things out of the ‘too hard basket’ and get sorted. It was only while stocking up on nappies and onesies did I see the importance of having adequate personal insurances. My husband and I were about to become responsible for another human being! Our baby would be totally dependent on us. I quickly organised with a trusted adviser to review our situation and together we went through a process that analysed our position, understood our needs, and put appropriate cover levels in place prior to the arrival of baby Lachlan (just in the nick of time!)

This second time round, I have been a little more organised. I knew I needed to refresh the $30 Post Office will kit my husband and I put in place ten years ago when we got married. Our only dependent then was our beloved Golden Retriever fur baby, Max. He was going to be well taken care of in my or our absence, and our limited super balances would be passed on to each other in the first instance, or the people we wanted if we both passed away (or so we thought).

We still hadn’t changed this will since having Lachlan, so I decided to attend one of the Estate Planning sessions run monthly at our offices by Bronwen Charleson, (Principal Lawyer) or Daniel Black (Senior Lawyer) at Coulter Roache Lawyers—I soon realised that our post office kit was in fact not sufficient and neither were our assumed superannuation arrangements.

Bronwen spoke about various strategies to pass wealth on to intended beneficiaries in the most protected manner. Depending on circumstances this could be a simple plan to a more comprehensive trust that provides asset protection, tax advantages and a plan and statement of wishes around the care of minors. I met with Bronwen not long after the session and had her ‘refresh’ (i.e. completely rewrite) my will and even include and allow for number two!

If you would like to attend an Estate Planning Session, info and registration details can be found on our website and our next free information session is Monday 11th July, 5:30pm at our Geelong office.

As an additional tip, here is a link to an external site which outlines some of the important aspects of Estate Planning.

Erica Fountain
Head of Innovation 

Please note: The advice in this article is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information.

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WOMEN – Professional Self-Taught Jugglers

Spotlight on Women - WEbsite SizeWhether you are single or in a relationship, one thing we all have in common is that we are juggling many roles all at once. I learnt quickly that once you begin to add little munchkins to your clan, the number of balls that you are juggling dramatically increases. When I thought I had achieved some rhythm to my new found skill of juggling, it was time to return to work. I had no idea what I was in for in regards to the level of organisation it would require trying to fit in my own personal time, setting goals for now and later, while continuing to run a house!

Returning to work is a big decision. For some it is financial and for others it is to assist with self-fulfilment. Whatever the reason, finding the right work life balance is crucial. There is no right or wrong level of work life balance. The solution that works for your family is individual.

Following returning to work, I began to experience guilt. Guilt for not being able to spend more time with my little ones, that I wasn’t completing as much at work as I had (in comparison to my old, full time employed, child free self), that the house wasn’t as tidy as it used to be and the list goes on! I had to find a way to put a positive spin on what I was doing and the reasons as to why I had returned to work. I realised it was to achieve my goals! Our goals often take second place to day to day activities, however even without realising it, it is another one of those balls we are juggling. Understanding and knowing why I was back at work and the benefits my employment brings to myself and my family was very important, empowering and motivating. Without goals, it is easy to question why. It helps you stay on track towards reaching those goals which are important to you. Also, it is hard to know if you are on the right track, if you don’t know where you are heading.

Goal setting doesn’t just end with the things you want to do in the next 12 months. Goal setting should include what you and your family want to do in 5 years – family holidays, education for your children, a new car, when it is that you and your partner would like to stop work or wind back into retirement. As far away as these milestones may seem, without having an active plan in place, time will continue to fly by. Without a solid plan our goals rarely materialise.

Planning your exciting goals and aspirations doesn’t have to be a weighted time consuming ball that you have to learn to juggle along with everything else. It is easier than you think if you work with someone who can help you plan and keep you motivated. It is very rewarding when you realise you are actually living and experiencing the achievement of the goals you wrote down.

We use systems all the time without realising. Just like we put systems (well try to!) in at home to make our home life easier, it is vitally important to establish systems that ensure your money is working for you, and your family.   Something as simple as structuring your banking correctly can have a big impact on how hard your money works for you.

Now that you are back at work and earning additional money to put towards your household, it is important to ensure that all the sacrifices that have been made to earn this money have not gone to waste. You need to ensure that your hard earned money is working for you.

I have written about my own personal experience, as a Mum working part time. In my professional life I am a Financial Planner with Income Solutions.   I regularly hear stories just like mine, which provided me with the motivation to create a tailored presentation for women which provides some examples of the impact receiving financial advice can make to your day to day lifestyle as well as your long term goals. For more information, book a one-on-one meeting or a workplace Income Solutions for Women session.

Invest in yourself – it could be the best investment you’ll ever make!  

Jess Hall, Financial Planner

 

Please note: The advice in this article is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information.

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Myth #5: Now I have a plan, I am set

Blog - Linked In Size (1)For the final instalment of the Financial Planning Myth Series, I wanted to touch on a Myth that even some people who already engage a Financial Planner believe; that is “Now that I have a Plan in place, I am all set and can execute the plan myself.

A Financial Plan is not unlike a Personal Training or eating plan; you get much better results when you have a coach who holds you accountable to enact the plan and to stick to it! Like weight loss or muscle gain goals, achieving financial goals requires hard work and dedication. Getting successful outcomes is always easier when you have someone challenging you along the way.

Whilst our industry is full of people who recommend change for change sake (mostly when it is not actually required), occasionally there are changes to your circumstances that you might not realise cause ripple effects right throughout your Financial Plan. For example, consider the impact of a large home renovation, whilst this might not seem like a huge deal, have you considered things like:

  • Does your Will need changing to reflect your wishes and to equalise your estate?
  • Do you require higher sums of Life and Total & Permanent Disability Insurance?
  • Does your Home Loan need reviewing and could you get a better rate now you have more debt (hence more bargaining power with the Bank)? Perhaps you should contact your Mortgage broker or lending specialist.
  • Are there strategies you could use like Debt Recycling to reduce your Mortgage more quickly?

A good Financial Planner can give you the tools and create a Plan to get you on the right path, but even the best laid plans will require tweaking and adjustments over time. The value added through a long-term partnership with your Planner can be invaluable.

To quote Will Rogers: ‘Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.

Steven Nickelson, Financial Planner

 

Please note: The advice in this article is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information.

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Myth #4: My Adviser should get me the best returns

SN blog 2016With recent market sentiment being all negative, oil price concerns, China devaluing the Yuan and Australian Share markets at a 2 ½ year low earlier this week, it’s timely that I post the 4th Financial Planning myth of the series; My Adviser should get me the best returns.

A good Financial Adviser, in fact, should be brave enough to admit that they’re unable to control markets and manipulate your portfolio to time markets and ‘buy low and sell high.’ Likewise, adding value by ‘picking’ individual stocks or Fund Managers is elusive.

As John Bogle, Founder and former CEO of Vanguard puts it, ‘Successful Investing is all about common sense.’ ‘Simple arithmetic suggests, and history confirms, that the winning strategy is to own all of the nation’s publicly held businesses at very low cost.’

“So what does a Financial Adviser do, then?”

A truly great Adviser should assist you to build a capital base that produces enough income to enjoy the lifestyle you want to live in the future; all whilst juggling your short term goals such as building a family, educating said loved ones, paying for travel to give your family great experiences along the way, covering contingencies (in case life doesn’t go as planned) and allowing you work-life balance – so you can enjoy the spoils of your hard work.

Indeed, there are many roles an Adviser should play in your life; including educating you to make sound decisions with money, reassuring you during tough times, giving you recognition for your efforts and achievements, providing you with peace of mind, and offering a sounding board to bounce ideas off.

My favourite description is ‘an unreasonable friend’. As a coach and a friend, your Adviser will be someone in your life who gets behind you and can give you a nudge beyond the normal limits you have set for yourself in order to help you reach for something greater. Someone who will not simply tell you what you want to hear, but rather what you need to hear, and always put your interests in front of theirs. It sounds simple, but that is often very difficult to find.

To book an appointment with an Income Solutions Adviser, visit our website now!

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RETHINKING YOUR DECISIONS

Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of JulyAs part of my current study I was required to research and analyse the Charter Hall Group. I am inclined to share some of my findings with you.

Charter Hall Group (CHG), is a property funds manager which, was founded in 1991. The group employs specialist intellectual property and advanced intellectual knowledge to manage property assets across retail, office, residential and industrial properties. These assets can be held in either unlisted, or listed property trust.

The Charter Hall Group’s intellectual property includes investment management, asset management, property management, transaction services, development services, and treasury, finance, and legal and custodian services as outlined in the Charter Hall Group Annual Report 2015. Consequently, Charter Hall consider themselves to be the upmost experts in property.

On the 16th of June 2006, the Charter Hall Group floated on the ASX, closing at $4.97.

On the 14th of December 2015, the Charter Hall Group closing price was $4.33. This demonstrates a loss of over 12%, in 9.5 years.

I ask you, taking into consideration the information I have just shared with you.

If the experts at Charter Hall are unable to make a profit in the property market, why do so many Australians invest their time, and expend their energy trying to turn property into profit?

David Ramsay, Founder and CEO

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