Benefits of Advice

Lee Nickelson is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

In the wake of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuating and Financial Services Industry, it is important that we continue to focus on the benefits of receiving expert Financial Advice.

SunSuper commissioned CoreData to investigate the benefits of advice in their 2017 Value of Advice report which produced some interesting results. Overwhelmingly, those surveyed who receive financial advice are more ”well” in life.  They are better equipped to deal with unexpected expenses, more prepared for retirement and have more confidence in making financial decisions (1).

80% of those currently advised believe advice has given them more confidence in making financial decisions

Financial literacy is an important benefit and outcome of an advice relationship. Whilst we don’t expect clients to follow the movements of the NASDAQ, having an understanding of investment characteristics such as income versus capital values, the importance of asset allocation and investing for the long term gives clients greater confidence when making financial decisions.  This in turn brings a greater sense of financial security and less worrying about money.  After all, our definition of wealth is an absence of financial worry.

79% of those currently advised believe advice has given them more control over their financial position

Planning for the future is so important as it gives you confidence you can achieve your immediate and future financial goals.  Whether it is setting aside funds for a rainy day, increasing your savings, or contributing to a retirement plan, having an advice relationship allows you to map out your own path to financial freedom.

77% of those currently advised believe advice has helped them feel prepared for retirement

Many of us think that retirement is so far away that it doesn’t warrant planning now – this couldn’t be further from the truth.  Einstein’s 8th wonder of the world is compounding returns, earning interest on your interest, so paying attention to your retirement nest egg early, no matter how small, is well worth while.

67% of those currently advised feel advice has made them more equipped to handle sudden, one off costs

Through accountability, information and support, receiving financial advice can help people establish contingency plans, insurance and debt management strategies to deal with unexpected events and life’s twists and turns.

80% of those currently advised believe advice has given them more peace of mind.

Financial security is important for everyone, to know we are on the right track and not borrowing from our future to live the life we are currently.  A staggering statistic from the report is 39% of those unadvised felt they had enough money to pay for recreational activities compared to 79% who were advised.

Financial stress affects people’s lives in quantifiable ways.  It can affect your health, relationships at home, and both your productivity and attendance at work.  This is why we continue to believe in the value of financial advice; knowing that it improves lifestyle outcomes and overall wellbeing.

If you are interested in your own financial health check, please don’t hesitate to contact an Financial Adviser at Income Solutions.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.

Plugging into Technology Stocks

On August 2, Apple became the world’s first company to reach US$1 trillion in market value. It took 42 years to get there from humble beginnings in an LA garage, but a handful of younger technology companies collectively known as the FANGs – Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google – are already nipping at its heels.

What do they have in common? All have used innovative technology to create new markets, often beginning with a single product or service. Think Apple’s early desktop computers, Amazon’s online book retailer, Netflix’s streaming service, Facebook’s social network and Google’s search engine.

According to Forbes magazine, these tech giants have become so much a part of everyday life that their products or services are regarded almost as utilities, as essential to modern living as power or water.i They have also used technology and digital transformation to redefine customer experience in a way that is leaving traditional companies behind.

While their products and services may be cutting edge, their investment appeal is old school. Legendary investor Warren Buffett has been a major Apple shareholder for some time. He is known to look for stocks with reliable, long-term earnings at an attractive price with a strong ‘moat’. A moat might be a brand name, key products or high barriers to exit. Switch your iPhone for another brand for example, and you lose your iTunes music library and countless apps you downloaded.

China unleashes BATs

While Apple and the FANGs are US-based, they face stiff competition in the global tech stakes from China’s BATs. Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent may not be household names in Australia, but they deserve to be on investors’ radar because they are a dominant market force not just in China but increasingly elsewhere as well.

Hong Kong-listed Tencent Holdings is known as China’s equivalent of Facebook. Tencent was the first Asian company to reach the US$500 billion stock market valuation mark. It’s WeChat social media platform recently reached an eye-popping one billion members and it’s also involved in online gaming, music, e-commerce and smartphones.

Alibaba (China’s Amazon plus eBay) is the world’s biggest retailer. It’s New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) listing in 2014 was the world’s biggest and this year it became the second Asian company to be valued at more than US$500 billion.

Baidu (China’s Google) is the second most widely used search engine in the world. It’s also moving into mapping, artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles. And these are just the biggest of many emerging Chinese tech stocks.

Opportunities and challenges

The tech giants are also beginning to expand into new business areas such as cloud storage, music and video streaming. Some are also growing by acquisition, with Facebook buying What’s App and Microsoft buying LinkedIn.

Yet big does not necessarily deliver success. Facebook’s share price recently fell 19 per cent in a day. The sell-off was due partly to concerns about the company’s ability to deal with privacy issues, but also to a flattening out of user numbers. China’s BATs also face challenges from the worsening trade dispute with the US.

So how can Australian investors participate in the dynamic technology sector without getting burnt?

Getting down to business

Diversification is the key to investing in the world’s leading tech stocks, while minimising the risk of individual companies performing poorly. The simplest way to gain exposure is via a traditional managed fund or an exchange-traded fund (ETF) which can be bought and sold on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) like individual shares.

For the broadest exposure there are global technology funds. A popular way to access the FANGs plus Apple, Microsoft and others is to choose a fund that tracks the Nasdaq 100 Index. Although the US-based Nasdaq exchange is home to a wide range of companies, it is well known for tech stocks.

Tech companies are often seen as exciting, but investors would do well to follow Buffett’s lead and make sure that the fundamentals are sound, looking at their financial health and ability to deliver sustainable returns. If you would like to talk about your investment strategy, give us a call.

i ‘Apple and the rise of the trillion dollar firm’, 6 August 2018, https://www.forbes.com/sites/dantedisparte/2018/08/06/apple-and-the-rise-of-the-trillion-dollar-firm/#6eecde0c631d

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.

Capital VS Income – Which is more valuable?

When we ponder our wealth, most of us immediately jump to the capital value of our assets. We believe that if we own things that are worth more than what our neighbour owns, we are wealthier. But are we?

 

Firstly, most of us believe our house is our greatest asset, therefore representing the bulk of our asset base. There is a stark distinction between a financial asset and a personal or lifestyle asset. Centrelink does not assess the homes we live in as financial assets because by definition, our house is a lifestyle asset. This is mainly due to the simple fact that our house costs us money rather than making it for us. Yes, if you use your equity wisely, you can purchase a financial asset, but more on that another day.

I want to focus on comparing capital and income.

Australian’s believe simply owning as many financial assets as possible is the key to wealth creation. The more they’re worth, the wealthier they are. I challenge this theory. Imagine I owned a financial asset base in retirement worth $1million, and this generated around $25,000 of income a year. You own a financial asset base in retirement worth $800,000,¹ which produces income of around $35,000 a year. I am $200,000 wealthier than you in capital perspective, however you’re $10,000 worth of annual income wealthier than me. Who is the wealthier person?

Let’s say our ideal retirement income is $35,000pa. I would need around another $400,000² worth of the financial assets I own, just to generate that much income. You only need $800,000. My balance sheet might have a higher bottom line, however, your income statement is stronger again. Which is more valuable? An asset base that you would need to slowly drawdown on to reach your ideal income level? Or an asset base which produces your ideal income level without needing to sell any of it? And, you did not need to save as hard for it.

If you need to sell portions of your capital base in retirement just to breakeven, you bring in avoidable and unnecessary risk you just do not need. You might hypothetically own a parcel of shares, that historically have failed to pay regular dividends, and thus, to make your $35,000 you need to sell some. What if this happens on the same day President Trump puts out a ridiculous Tweet, and in a knee-jerk reaction from the public, the market drops? (In reality I would tell you to buy more shares, because in this situation I like to say that they’re on special so stock up, similar to bananas at Coles) What if this also happens on the same day the RBA raise the cash rate by 50 basis points so the offer to buy your investment property gets revoked? You cannot chip off a couple of bricks or sell the spare room to pay for your annual flights to Bali. Not to mention that whenever you sell shares or a property, you have to fork out relatively high transactional costs and in the case of property, wait around 90 days to see the cash in your account. And once you do sell your shares or property, you do not want to leave too much of the net sale proceeds in the bank, because 2% interest rates are not helping your income situation too much.

Income is spending power and spending power enables us to do the things we want to do. We do not want to see the retirement finish line on the horizon, to suddenly realize we are riding a truck full of assets, but are income poor. At income solutions, our definition of wealth is an absence of financial worry, an income stream you cannot outlive, and a meaningful legacy for those whom you love. This definition is deliberately ambiguous enough for anyone to apply his or her own situation to it.

I now ask you if the financial asset base you are slowly building meets this definition?

If you would like to organize an informal discussion about you and your financial situation, please do not hesitate to contact me at [email protected] or alternatively at 03 5229 0577.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product.
¹Assuming a growth asset base earning 4.35%
²Assuming an asset base of cash, earning 2.5%

Ignore the Hype

Gareth Daniels is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

As I have mentioned before (and no doubt mention again) when reading articles in the papers, watching news on TV or even listening to the radio to and from work, it is always vital to objectively consider the information we are being given.

As a history student, I was taught to always consider who has produced the source of the information, who their intended audience is and why it may have been produced. That foundation can serve us well when considering decisions that relate to our long term financial security.

At the heart of this is accepting that popular media constantly misuses the word ‘investor.’ Many of you may have heard Peter Thornhill speak or even read his book Motivated Money. He correctly spends time focusing on the difference between speculation and investing; the first being the “buying or selling of commodities or stocks… in the hope of an unexpected rise in the price“¹ and the second being “use of money productively so that an income is obtained.

Peter goes on to note that “speculation is described as investment simply to legitimise activity that has nothing to do with investing.

I read with interest the article This asset manager thinks Australian property ‘calamity’ is coming, so he sold all the firms shares². Consider this article in conjunction with the process of analysing a source:

Who has produced it: A national media organisation that knows doom and gloom predictions sell papers

Who is the intended audience: The misconception that all investors are speculators and all speculators are investors means they are attempting to reach as many people as possible. Regarding the interviewee, I would suggest he is trying to reach future potential customers (pitching for business as he apparently knows better than the market) and those clients to whom they have just returned their money (justification for selling the fund).

Why has it been produced: Again, for the publication it is the desire to get eyeballs on their paper and website and for the interviewee, future potential customers by an apparent display or foresight whilst pacifying those clients to who they have just had their money returned by way of defense of their actions.

Philip Parker may be a top fund manager as the article notes, but by what bench mark? The ASX top 200 is cited in the article, all well and good but it is the capital value of this bench mark that is the apparent measure? I would prefer to measure against corporate profits shared out as income via dividend. I would also not like to get sucked into the yield trap, jumping in and out of different assets and significantly increasing the likely effects of market timing risk.

If values are over inflated then surely it is speculators that are at risk with their hopes of gains at considerable risk that should be worried. Investors who own quality assets for the long term to be in receipt of income, should not even dedicate a second of their time to read an article clearly aimed at speculators. It can become stressful to build wealth via a fund manager who believes that over the long term, through active management³ they can beat the market rather than simply owning the best that the market has to offer. The latter allows you to confidently ignore the short term fluctuations in perceived value and and enjoying the true value of a repeating, tax-effective and increasing income stream over time.

What is intriguing is the (potentially) strategic move by this fund manager. Despite the litany of unfulfilled doomsday predictions that regularly crop up, the article even sites a few, these are readily forgotten, whilst the ones that do appear to come true elevate those that predicated them to genius status. So, this firm and it’s investment team either get lauded as the special few that were able to read the tea leaves correctly, or they simply “enjoy their time off” before returning to the fold to make further predictions; attempting to reach those that believe in speculation rather than investing. All this whilst the rest of us carry on with our investment strategy, focusing on what is important to us and critically analysing the overload of information that we are unnecessarily bombarded with.

 

1. Thornhill, P. (2015) Motivated Money; Sound Financial Advice for the post GFC World, 5th Revision. Australia: Motivated Money, pg 12

2. Patrick Commins, B. (2017) This asset manager thinks Australian property ‘calamity’ is coming, so he sold all the firm’s shares. [online] Business Insider Australia. Available at: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/this-asset-manager-thinks-an-australian-property-calamity-is-coming-so-he-sold-all-the-firms-shares-2017-5 [Accessed 7 Jul. 2017]

3. The belief that a manager knows better than most can pre-empt economic cycles, property bubbles, threats of war and crisis around the world and a whole host of other fads. They are effectively trying to speculate their way to wealth via capital appreciation.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product.

Social Proof: The herds and investing

We associate herding with animals. Actually, herding is evident in the human world; in business, in the consumer world and particularly in investing.

What is herding and why does it happen?

And why do herds often form on the basis of such little information? Why do herds form even when that information or such behaviour may be mistaken?

The answers to these questions can be found in something called social proof.

What is social proof? 

Social proof is when people follow the actions of others in an attempt to reflect the “correct” behaviour for a given situation.

This urge to conform to established patterns or to follow the lead of perceived authority figures, trendsetters or simply people “in the know” is the social glue that binds people into a herd. Social proof is the underlying psychological bias that results in what we recognise as “groupthink” (or “risky-shift”) behaviour.

Does this matter? 

In many aspects of life, this tendency to conform and follow is beneficial. In fact, social proof is one of the key human traits that underpinned our evolutionary move to community-based civilisation.

The impulse to act like others in the tribe would have been powerful for millennia.

It follows that the operation of social proof is cumulative and carries a reflexive, self-reinforcing momentum. As the effect ripples out across a larger number of people, the size of the herd will multiply, encouraging more people to confirm the assumption that this must be the right way to act.

But just because many are doing a particular thing, does not make it correct.

What’s the proof?

The best-known experiment that showed the concept of social proof was carried out in 1935 by Muzafer Sherif. He put people into a darkroom and showed them a dot of light several feet away. In reality the dot was not moving but, due to the autokinetic effect, it appeared to move to individuals by different degrees.

When asked individually and then in groups how much it moved, individuals deferred to the group estimate even when it was out of line with their experience. Given the movement of the light was ambiguous, Sherif showed that the participants were relying on each other to define a group-informed “reality”.

The evidence suggests that the social proof bias is amplified in complex situations where the “right way” to act is ambiguous yet the importance of being accurate is critical. In the midst of this complexity, the assumption made is that surrounding people possess more knowledge about the situation.

Investing, then, offers perfect conditions for social proof to operate in an exaggerated way, giving rise to the herd behaviour that can drive bubbles and bursts.

Herded investors

When stock markets are falling, there is a strong pull on our emotions as social proof (and loss aversion) encourages an urge to sell if we see others doing so.

Why are others selling? Do they know something we don’t?

The evidence from behavioural finance suggests the answers to these questions could be surprisingly irrational – that people sell because others are selling.

In stock markets, it is clear that herd reactions don’t need rational thought for fuel.

Think long-term

In the long run, stock prices tend to reflect the intrinsic value of companies. In the short-term, however, the market is often a barometer of changing investor sentiment and a reflection of the average view of the players in the market at that moment.

So why would you aspire to follow the average investor?

We know from stock-market holdings data that investors are prone to short-termism – stock-holding periods have fallen significantly since 1985. The evidence suggests that some investors – the Chinese in particular – are more short term than others. We know that stock-market participation has broadened significantly in China in recent years as many individuals have opened trading accounts. While institutions still own most of the market, data suggests these small investors can account for as much as 80% of daily trading on the domestic Chinese exchanges.

This raises the possibility that falls in the Chinese stock markets, triggered by short-termist investors, can trigger sympathetic falls in other markets via social proof and herding.

In today’s synchronised world, it seems like only the first domino need falter to set off a sentimental chain reaction.

Don’t play copy-cat 

Another interesting dynamic to consider is whether there may be large forced sellers in the market. These may or may not be “trend-setters” worth following, yet their large influence on the market could nevertheless trigger trend-following behaviour.

The sovereign wealth funds of large exporters and oil-producing countries, for example, have accumulated large holdings of stocks in recent years. If an oil-producing nation were to sell stocks held in these funds to raise cash due to the hit a lower oil price is having on the government’s fiscal position, and that is instrumental in setting off a decline in stock markets, should investors around the world become nervous? Possibly, but then again perhaps these are investors who are exposed to companies who benefit from a lower oil price?

The market will correct itself 

Certainly, it seems like social proof can trigger and exaggerate herd behaviour in the absence of rational drivers. Fortunately, there are natural limits to directional herd behaviour as trends fizzle out and sellers become exhausted.

At some point, when the gloom is felt to be overdone, a new trendsetter often emerges – the value-driven investor – who may kick off a new herd behaviour that acts in the opposite direction to encourage a rally in stocks.

With all these mini trends and trend-reversals, the job of keeping up with them is nigh-on impossible – the trading costs would also be onerous. It is little wonder then that successful investors all agree on one thing – the benefit of taking a longer-term view.

In the end, the stock market is rational and reflective of human consumption and human endeavor. It’s people, and their tendency to follow the social norm too quickly, which is irrational.

Source
Reproduced with permission of Fidelity Australia

Please note: The advice in this article is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information.

Adversity and perseverance in every day life

In December, we Bec blog Jan 2016at Income Solutions held our End of Year Event in Geelong and Melbourne to say “thank you” to our wonderful clients. Every year we have a theme and this time it was “Adversity and Perseverance”. What does that have to do with Financial Planning? Well, in terms of “hanging in there”, quite a lot really.

In a complex world with billions of inhabitants, we often find ourselves needing to be tough in order to get by – and some have it much harder than others. One of our guest speakers at the event was Moira Kelly; an amazing humanitarian who thinks nothing of entering a war torn country to help sick and injured children receive adequate medical care and a warm bed. Her list of achievements and awards from 1986 onwards would make most of us feel incredibly guilty for complaining about a bad hair day or not having a nice enough car.

Moira is one of those special people with a very interesting psyche that not all of us are born with. As a little girl, she wanted to work with Mother Theresa to help those in need. At the age of 18, her wish came true. However, Moira made it happen. She willed it to happen, but also planned and took the necessary steps to make her dream a reality.

A timely example of this level of perseverance is Mr David Bowie and his rise to fame. This week I watched a documentary on his journey to creating the Ziggy Stardust character. I like to think I’m quite knowledgeable about music artists, as my preferred literary genre is the music biography. However, I wasn’t entirely aware of just how long it took Bowie to score a hit single and sell a decent amount of records. As David Jones, he formed his first band at 15, at 20 he released a strange novelty single that flopped, followed by a string of unsuccessful singles. It took Bowie ten years to become the huge star and incredible artist we know and love (and mourn) today. The level of belief in himself and his talent is what eventually made him one of the most influential music artists of all time. Most musicians would have given up during that ten year period.

So how does adversity and perseverance apply to you and I, in our everyday lives? We don’t need to be a Moira Kelly or a David Bowie to reach our goals. However, if we want to live a fulfilling life and do the things we love, we have to “hang in there” sometimes. Are you in the right job? Do you even like it, let alone love it? Would you consider going back to study to get a job you really want? Are you currently earning what you deserve? In terms of finances, is your money working for you? How (if at all) is your money and super invested?

So many questions to ask ourselves! Sometimes we have to change a few things in our lives to get on the path we should be on. Some of us will face adversity, most of us will need to persevere – but we only get one shot at life. At Income Solutions, we’re more than just financial planners – we believe that investing in yourself and doing what you love is the key to a happy and fulfilling life; and we talk to our clients about this every day.

Are you just starting out and want to find out about putting a plan in place to secure your financial future? Perhaps you just want to learn more about how your hard earned cash can be better invested? We have a range of free information sessions held in our Geelong and Melbourne offices which cater for everyone. It doesn’t matter how much you earn, or where you are in life, you can make some informed decisions and sensible choices to help design yourself a life that you can be passionate and excited about. So, get in touch!

Rebecca Lee, Marketing Manager

Myth #4: My Adviser should get me the best returns

SN blog 2016With recent market sentiment being all negative, oil price concerns, China devaluing the Yuan and Australian Share markets at a 2 ½ year low earlier this week, it’s timely that I post the 4th Financial Planning myth of the series; My Adviser should get me the best returns.

A good Financial Adviser, in fact, should be brave enough to admit that they’re unable to control markets and manipulate your portfolio to time markets and ‘buy low and sell high.’ Likewise, adding value by ‘picking’ individual stocks or Fund Managers is elusive.

As John Bogle, Founder and former CEO of Vanguard puts it, ‘Successful Investing is all about common sense.’ ‘Simple arithmetic suggests, and history confirms, that the winning strategy is to own all of the nation’s publicly held businesses at very low cost.’

“So what does a Financial Adviser do, then?”

A truly great Adviser should assist you to build a capital base that produces enough income to enjoy the lifestyle you want to live in the future; all whilst juggling your short term goals such as building a family, educating said loved ones, paying for travel to give your family great experiences along the way, covering contingencies (in case life doesn’t go as planned) and allowing you work-life balance – so you can enjoy the spoils of your hard work.

Indeed, there are many roles an Adviser should play in your life; including educating you to make sound decisions with money, reassuring you during tough times, giving you recognition for your efforts and achievements, providing you with peace of mind, and offering a sounding board to bounce ideas off.

My favourite description is ‘an unreasonable friend’. As a coach and a friend, your Adviser will be someone in your life who gets behind you and can give you a nudge beyond the normal limits you have set for yourself in order to help you reach for something greater. Someone who will not simply tell you what you want to hear, but rather what you need to hear, and always put your interests in front of theirs. It sounds simple, but that is often very difficult to find.

To book an appointment with an Income Solutions Adviser, visit our website now!

DAVID RAMSAY’S END OF YEAR COMMENT

As the year comDavid EoYes to an end, you will see in the media the so-called financial experts trying to predict what the share market will return in 2016.

Personally, I never make short term predictions about the share market; but if I did it would similar to Nick Murray’s prediction for the US market for 2016. Many people say if the US sneezes we get a cold, however I hope we get what Murray predicts the US will receive in 2016:

“We’re simply observing that five hundred large profit-seeking companies, managed by experienced professionals, are currently planning to commit very large cash sums to strategies which might, if successful, result in both direct and indirect benefits to the patient, diversified, long-term investor”. Nick Murray, Client’s Corner, Dec 2015.

To find out more, I urge you to visit Nick Murray’s website and subscribe to his Newsletter Client’s Corner. The article is entitled How Companies Are Planning To Reward Shareholders In 2016. I also recommend, if you have not already done so – that you attend our free information evening Common Sense Investing. We have dates scheduled for January, however if you are still enjoying your holidays, our 2016 dates and can be viewed here.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all.

David Ramsay, CEO and Founder

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