Benefits of Advice

Lee Nickelson is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

In the wake of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuating and Financial Services Industry, it is important that we continue to focus on the benefits of receiving expert Financial Advice.

SunSuper commissioned CoreData to investigate the benefits of advice in their 2017 Value of Advice report which produced some interesting results. Overwhelmingly, those surveyed who receive financial advice are more ”well” in life.  They are better equipped to deal with unexpected expenses, more prepared for retirement and have more confidence in making financial decisions (1).

80% of those currently advised believe advice has given them more confidence in making financial decisions

Financial literacy is an important benefit and outcome of an advice relationship. Whilst we don’t expect clients to follow the movements of the NASDAQ, having an understanding of investment characteristics such as income versus capital values, the importance of asset allocation and investing for the long term gives clients greater confidence when making financial decisions.  This in turn brings a greater sense of financial security and less worrying about money.  After all, our definition of wealth is an absence of financial worry.

79% of those currently advised believe advice has given them more control over their financial position

Planning for the future is so important as it gives you confidence you can achieve your immediate and future financial goals.  Whether it is setting aside funds for a rainy day, increasing your savings, or contributing to a retirement plan, having an advice relationship allows you to map out your own path to financial freedom.

77% of those currently advised believe advice has helped them feel prepared for retirement

Many of us think that retirement is so far away that it doesn’t warrant planning now – this couldn’t be further from the truth.  Einstein’s 8th wonder of the world is compounding returns, earning interest on your interest, so paying attention to your retirement nest egg early, no matter how small, is well worth while.

67% of those currently advised feel advice has made them more equipped to handle sudden, one off costs

Through accountability, information and support, receiving financial advice can help people establish contingency plans, insurance and debt management strategies to deal with unexpected events and life’s twists and turns.

80% of those currently advised believe advice has given them more peace of mind.

Financial security is important for everyone, to know we are on the right track and not borrowing from our future to live the life we are currently.  A staggering statistic from the report is 39% of those unadvised felt they had enough money to pay for recreational activities compared to 79% who were advised.

Financial stress affects people’s lives in quantifiable ways.  It can affect your health, relationships at home, and both your productivity and attendance at work.  This is why we continue to believe in the value of financial advice; knowing that it improves lifestyle outcomes and overall wellbeing.

If you are interested in your own financial health check, please don’t hesitate to contact an Financial Adviser at Income Solutions.

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.

How to kill a conversation – ‘lets talk about super’

Gareth Daniels is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

Driving home from work last night there was a conversation the radio relating to super funds and how they perform relative to each other.

Many people would reach for the dial or press the button to change channels but the nerd in me resisted.

The item was a simple one; a firm has compiled independent research into the performance of super funds every year for the last five years and rates them accordingly on an annual basis.

The cynic in me listened intently for the criteria by which they had categorised the funds, but I had a bit of a ‘Wow!’ moment when they stated that they had looked at performance net of all fees and charges and had reached the overall conclusion that funds that charge lower fees typically outperformed funds that charged higher fees!

Further, in most cases, Australians would see a better performance from their super fund if they selected a low-cost index option that tracked the broader market rather than paying performance fees to active fund managers who fell short of the bench mark over the long-term.

Now I know I can be a bit sarcastic, but that ‘Wow!’ moment was genuine.

Simple, common sense advice can sadly be lacking in the superannuation space, frankly in financial planning in general. So when I hear it from an external source it jumps out at me and I realise that maybe we are not alone in our philosophies.

I downloaded the report that the firm produced, and a couple of key comments shouted at me from the pages;

Our research shows there is a clear correlation between high fees and long-term underperformance in super (The Fat Cat Funds Report Super Fund Guide 2018 page 3)

Poor fund performance comes predominantly from active management fees as well as higher administration and operating expenses than necessary (The Fat Cat Funds Report Super Fund Guide 2018 page 3)1

The funny thing is this information probably doesn’t surprise you. It is logical; it is common sense. So why don’t more of us follow it?

Like superannuation itself, the concept at the heart of following an index approach is BORING! We don’t want to talk about so its sits at the back of our minds. Over time we might not fully remember

why we are following that strategy anyway, particularly with the drip drip effect of other people’s opinions impacting on us. The reality is, what is there to talk about anyway?

Imagine the barbeque conversation;

“Yeah so I er um yeah paid no attention to my superfund again this year but as I track the broader Aussie market I got a nice steady long-term average return and I er um received a good level of fully franked dividends and I didn’t have to manage or worry about anything to get that…”

Well, that’s not very interesting is it? Not compared to the person who runs their self-managed super fund and trades shares daily and has a no recourse loan for the residential unit development that they are building up there in wherever and they had to meet with their accountant for three hours last week because there was some problem with the audit and now it seems like they might have to take that piece of art off the wall an put it storage because it “doesn’t really meet the sole purpose test after all”…. What?

Superannuation is an investment vehicle for you to set yourself up for the retirement lifestyle that you want. Research shows that a lower cost fund with an indexing approach will typically provide better long-term result than any other investment option. The point is that the more you pay in fees through more complex investment options the more likely that the long-term returns will be lower.

Our research shows that 96% of balanced super funds underperformed a simple low-cost index strategy after fees and taxes. This is consistent with research from Finalytiq4 which found similar results in the UK, and S&P Dow Jones whose SPIVA research shows that 80% of active Australian share fund managers have underperformed the index over 15 years. (The Fat Cat Funds Report Super Fund Guide 2018 page 35)

Why does superannuation need to be an interesting conversation anyway? Why does managing money have to be at all? Far more interesting is what you do with the time you have to enjoy life rather than worrying about money and what you spend your passive income on!

So how does any of this impact you? If you have made it this far through the article, then you have already met more than half of your required quota for paying attention to superannuation this year. Well done!

From here, check in with your adviser and (subject to your risk profile) determine your level of exposure to growth assets which should come via an index approach, balance that with your need for defensive assets and then ensure that you are on a fee favourable platform.

Simple but not easy I know; but it is common sense!

 

1 The Fat Cat Funds Report Super Fund Guide 2018 is produced by by Stockspot Stockspot Pty Ltd ABN 163 214 319 is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 453421) of Sanlam Private Wealth (AFS License No. 337927). They are a Robbo Advice firm and have no affiliation or connection to Income Solutions. We still believe that personal relationships are at the heart of quality financial advice, and have referenced the The Fat Cat Funds Report Super Fund Guide 2018 as an opinion piece.
Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.

Changes To Superannuation From 1 July 2018

Australians buying their first home or downsizing in retirement are about to receive a helping hand thanks to new superannuation rules which come into effect on July 1. From that date, first home buyers will be able to contribute up to $30,000 into their super fund towards a home deposit while downsizers can put up to $300,000 of the proceeds of selling the family home into super.

This new measure has been devised to assist first home buyers, many of whom have struggled to save a deposit as rising prices put even entry level properties out of reach.

At the other end of the scale, the change is envisaged to help older homeowners who frequently find themselves in large houses while trying to survive on a modest super balance or the aged pension.

Here’s how the Federal Government hopes to improve the situation at both ends of the property market.

Buying a home

Under the new First Home Super Saver (FHSS) scheme, individuals can arrange for up to $30,000 to be deducted from their pre-tax income and put in their super account. They can then withdraw 85 per cent of that money ($25,500), plus any interest they’ve earned on it, to use for a home deposit. In the case of a couple, both partners can save $30,000, meaning a deposit of $51,000 (i.e. 85 per cent of $60,000) plus interest can be accumulated.

So what’s the catch?
It’s complicated.

For starters, individuals can only contribute $15,000 into their FHSS account in any one year. What’s more, the compulsory 9.5 per cent super contributions made by employers can’t be accessed; additional voluntary contributions need to be made. The annual contributions cap of $25,000 cannot be exceeded; this includes all voluntary contributions plus employer’s Super Guarantee contributions.

When the money is withdrawn, it is taxed at the individual’s marginal tax rate minus a 30 per cent tax offset. Effectively, that means most people will pay little or no tax although higher-income earners on high marginal rates will still pay some tax.

Selling a home

Under the Downsizer Super Contribution Scheme (DSC), homeowners who are 65 or older can put up to $300,000 of their home sale proceeds into their super provided it’s their place of residence and they’ve owned it for at least 10 years. In the case of a couple, both partners can deposit $300,000 (collectively $600,000) into super.

What’s the catch?

Unless you’re a wealthy retiree looking for a tax break there doesn’t appear to be one. For those who already have more than $1.3 million in super, adding a $300,000 downsizer contribution will breach the $1.6 million balance transfer cap which is the maximum balance that can be held in a tax-free super pension account. Given the current generation of Australians have been retiring with average super balances of well under $300,000, that is unlikely to be an issue for most downsizers.

What do you do now?

If you are looking to purchase your first home, you will need to check your super fund allows FHSS contributions and, more importantly, withdrawals. You’ll then need to arrange for your employer to deduct voluntary contributions of up to $15,000 a year. When you want to access your money, you will have to acquire a ‘FHSS determination’ (essentially a balance statement) from the Commissioner of Taxation before requesting your super fund to release the money.

Following approval of this request, your super fund deposits your FHHS money, minus any tax you’ve incurred, into your account. You then have 12 months to sign a contract to buy or build a home.

If you are looking to downsize your home, you will first need to check your super fund accepts downsizer contributions. If it does, you can deposit up to $300,000 within 90 days of receiving the proceeds of the sale. You’ll have to fill in and send your super fund a ‘downsizer contribution form’ before, or when transferring the money into your account.

If you’re hoping to either buy your first home or downsize, call us to discuss how the changes to super can save you money.

 

 

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.

Are You Engaged With Your Super?

Lee Nickelson is an Authorised Representative, GWM Adviser Services Limited, Australian Financial Services Licensee

Hands up who knows where their super is invested and what fees they are paying for the administration services they receive?   Anyone..?  You aren’t alone in the unengaged zone.  What is also emerging is that women are less likely than men to regularly engage with their superannuation¹… which is another issue in itself.

Seems crazy doesn’t it.. our superannuation assets have ballooned to $2.3 trillion² yet we aren’t paying attention.  Most rental property owners pay attention to the rent they charge (asset performance) and get quotes on repairs/bargain with real estate agents (manage costs) – so how do we start paying attention to our super?

The ‘Compare the Pair’ advertising campaign for industry super has been around for a couple of years now, but what has become interesting is there has never been a better time to compare superannuation funds.

Recent legislative changes to Regulatory Guide 97 have required superannuation funds, industry funds included, to disclose their fees and costs in a more transparent way resulting in a raft of new Product Disclosure Statements being released.

Many of the clients I have worked with since these changes have been surprised to realise their ‘cheap’ industry funds, aren’t the cheapest option out there anymore.  But on the flip side, it isn’t all about being in the cheapest fund – especially if it is at the expense of asset performance.  Investing in cash because it has low fees is unlikely to be in your best interest long term.

Different assets (cash, term deposits, shares, property) have different performance characteristics, and your superannuation administrator is investing a percentage of your money in each of these assets on your behalf. Make sure you are paying attention to the percentages you have in each asset class as this is one of the main drivers behind investment performance.

So why not log in whilst you are winding down before Christmas and get engaged with your super – check out what fees you are paying and how you are invested.  If you aren’t confident reviewing your superannuation yourself, we are here to help.

1. https://www.commbank.com.au/content/dam/caas/newsroom/docs/2017-06-28-financial-security-report.pdf

2. https://www.superannuation.asn.au/resources/superannuation-statistics

Any advice in this publication is of a general nature only and has not been tailored to your personal circumstances. Please seek personal advice prior to acting on this information. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way. Opinions constitute our judgement at the time of issue and are subject to change. Neither, the Licensee or any of the National Australia group of companies, nor their employees or directors give any warranty of accuracy, nor accept any responsibility for errors or omissions in this document. Before making a decision to acquire a financial product, you should obtain and read the Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) relating to that product. Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns. The information in this document reflects our understanding of existing legislation, proposed legislation, rulings etc as at the date of issue. In some cases the information has been provided to us by third parties. While it is believed the information is accurate and reliable, this is not guaranteed in any way.
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